How to discover, tame and activate your egos to supercharge your thinking

Find yourself an ego. This might sound like an odd phrase to start with but it’s exactly what it says it is. Knowing first that study and discovery of ego isn’t about how pig headed you are or how people experience you. It’s about your unconscious thinking.

People who achieve greatness possess many unique qualities one of which is unflappable self-belief. We cannot misunderstand the word ego and what it can help us understand about ourselves. Sigmund Freud talks about the models of personality, the development of a personality and the human mind being made of three district types. ID, EGO and the Superego.

The ID. The id is the impulsive (and unconscious) part of our psyche which responds directly and immediately to the instincts.

The personality of the newborn child is all id and only later does it develop an ego and super-ego.

The id remains infantile in its function throughout a person’s life, and does not change with time or experience, as it is not in touch with the external world. The id is not affected by reality, logic or the everyday world, as it operates within the unconscious part of the mind.

The id operates on the pleasure principle which is the idea that every wishful impulse should be satisfied immediately, regardless of the consequences

The ego.

The ego operates according to the reality principle, working out realistic ways of satisfying the id’s demands, often compromising or postponing satisfaction to avoid negative consequences of society. The ego considers social realities and norms, etiquette and rules in deciding how to behave.

Like the id, the ego seeks pleasure (i.e. tension reduction) and avoids pain, but unlike the id the ego is concerned with devising a realistic strategy to obtain pleasure. The ego has no concept of right or wrong; something is good simply if it achieves its end of satisfying without causing harm to itself or to the id.

Often the ego is weak relative to the headstrong id and the best the ego can do is stay on, pointing the id in the right direction and claiming some credit at the end as if the action were its own.

The superego.

The superego incorporates the values and morals of society which are learned from one’s parents and others. The superego’s function is to control the id’s impulses, especially those which society forbids, such as sex and aggression. It also has the function of persuading the ego to turn to moralistic goals rather than simply realistic ones and to strive for perfection.

The superego consists of two systems: The conscience and the ideal self. The conscience can punish the ego through causing feelings of guilt. For example, if the ego gives in to the id’s demands, the superego may make the person feel bad through guilt. The ideal self (or ego-ideal) is an imaginary picture of how you ought to be, and represents career aspirations, how to treat other people, and how to behave as a member of society.

How to use the Superego to enhance your thinking.

They visualise what they want and drive forward towards success. To do this yourself you will need to find a character within you that will help you create the outcome that you want. You need to build that character and work at becoming him/her each and every day. The best way – great questions?

Who is this new you? What do they believe in and how do they take action on those beliefs? How do they behave that helps them achieve the outcome you want? How do they treat themselves and others? What do they value and why do they help support their success?

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